Tag Archives: collectible

So Pretty in Pink

Hoppity  Ty®  Beanie Baby®


 

hoppity bunny

See it at Amazon

[Rating: 5/5]

Pros: Ty product,  collectible,  cute as can be


Cons: none noted

Ty® Beanie Babies®’ Hoppity Bunny measures 8 x 3.7 x 0,8 inches of plushy polyester fabric. Hoppity is a honey of a sugar pink rabbit having bright black eyes, triangle pink nose and pink whiskers. Around her throat is a small pink ribbon tied in a bow.

Hoppity is especially appealing in pink. Only her tail is presented in white. Her large flappy ears indicate she is a lop type rabbit with ears drooping on either side of her head rather than standing erect.


Hoppity a popular Beanie for collectors and her companion Beanie Babies Floppity and Hippity make up the Bunny Trio. Surface wash only.

Born 3 April 1996, Hoppity’s poem reads:

Hopscotch is what she likes to play


If you don’t join in, she’ll hop away

So play a game if you have the time,

She likes to play, rain or shine!


All in all she is a perfect addition to my growing collection of Beanies.

For several years I used Beanies in my First Grade Classroom, as theme setters for holidays and the like. And, Beanies were used as sentence and story starters for Little Folks who might be stumped for what to write about.

As with other Ty Beanies I find the plush used to be soft, eyes are bright shiny, seams are well sewn, arms, legs, ears are secure and well attached. Pliable, poseable toy is filled with small pellets, and can be set on desk where Hoppity will sit, gazing, and will not tumble or sag.


Ever since 1993 Ty Inc., has fashioned 400+ different Beanie Babies in a diversity of sizes from wee softies appearing as a McDonald’s happy meal toys, to large Beanies measuring about 8 inches.

Hoppity holds appeal for boys and girls, and adults alike. Hoppity is intended particularly for those like and perhaps collect bunnies as do children and many adults.

Hoppity with the wee plastic eyes and nose is not recommended as a pet toy or for small children.

Ty Inc., established in 1993 when Ty Warner of Illinois produced his initial small critter shape, cloth bag, packed with small white, pellets sent to the market place has become a key contender in the toy race.

Beanies are available on Amazon, and I find them often at thrift and jumble shops as well as garage sales. If buying at jumble shop, yard sales and the like be careful to always check to be sure the Trademark Ty Beanie, heart shaped tag is in place to guarantee purchase is a genuine Ty product.

Recognized the world over; Beanie Babies, some might say they are filled with joy as well as pellets, are an over-the-top iconic, well-loved character in the toy market. Well made, sturdy seams to assure no bits on the floor, and for most of the softies having sewn nose and eyes, no pieces to swallow or otherwise cause harm, then again they are not indestructible. Ty Beanie Babies are some of the best loved toys adored by children and collected by adults everywhere.

Happy to recommend Ty Beanie Babies’ Pink Plush Hoppity.

===========================

Reviewed by Molly’s Reviews

molly martin

===========================

NOTE: Ty® Inc. is an American PLUSH ANIMAL Toy Company based in Westmont, Illinois.

The most famous line of products produced by this company are the BEANIE BABIES®, on the other hand, Ty also manufactures other lines of stuffed toys. The Ty logo is a red heart with the lower-case letters “ty.” A tag is found affixed to all Ty stuffed toys, and inside each tag is the name of the toy and a 4 line poem about it.

Since 1993, the year when Ty Inc. was founded; the company has mass-produced nearly 400 assorted Beanie Babies.

My personal introduction to the world of Beanies® was 1996 when long lines of adults could be seen extending across the restaurant and out the door, and at times down the sidewalk of local McDonald’s® eateries. Teenie Beanie Babies® Smaller, fun versions of Beanie Babies were included in McDonald’s Happy Meals®.

Several subsequent promotions took place with various wee Beanies available.

The lesson taught by Ty Warner, sole owner of Ty Inc., the company behind Beanie Babies may be do what you enjoy, do it well, promote and diversify.

My personal favorites continue to be the Teenie Weenies gathered from McDonalds children’s meals.

 

Ty Inc

280 Chestnut Ave

Westmont, IL, 60559 United States

The Best (Top 48) GameCube “RACING & DRIVING” Games for Adults and Older Kids (Collector’s Complete List)

Original GameCube console, "platinum" version
The GameCube console was released in late 2001 and discontinued in 2007. It was initially available in purplish “Indigo” and “Jet Black” colors; but a year later the above “Platinum” limited edition became available.

Sure, an original Wii console plays a nice selection of "Wii" racing games But it also plays GameCube discs-- including many great racing/driving titles!
Sure, an original Wii console can play a nice selection of “Wii” racing-game discs. But it can also play “GameCube” game discs– including many worthy racing/driving titles.

 

Pros: Plenty of great-looking, fun-to-play racing and driving games were made for the GameCube. And many extant Nintendo Wii console models (manufactured before October 2011) are fully backward-compatible with GameCube games, controllers and memory cards.

Cons: Later Wii console models (introduced after September 2011) are not backward-compatible with GameCube games, controllers and cards.

 

Preface  (Feel free to skip ahead to the list of games.)

Now, despite my owning numerous GameCube games, I’ve never owned or played an original GameCube console. And, frankly, I have mixed feelings about that thing’s outer appearance. On the one hand, I (generally) respect Nintendo’s longstanding willingness to introduce innovatory products – in this instance a console that’s not only shaped unconventionally but also plays unusually small-diameter game discs. On the other hand, that “cube” – especially when sporting its primary purplish (so-called Indigo) hue – strikes me as something befitting a toddler’s playroom, not a grownup’s game room. [That said, I’ll grant that a GameCube does look a bit less childish when wearing Jet Black or Platinum.]

Anyway, I bought my first Nintendo Wii console in January 2010; and I wasted no time taking advantage of that system’s backward compatibility with GameCube game discs, memory cards, and wired controllers. Moreover, I replaced my Wii console’s standard “composite” video cable with a third-party “component” cable – which (connected to my Samsung LCD TV) quite noticeably improved the on-screen appearance of not only Wii games but also GameCube games.

Though I’m also a fan of such video-game genres as arcade, shmups, and sports, my favorite genre – by far – is “racing and driving.” And I’m pleased that a respectable number of such titles were released for the GameCube during its “heyday” (if that word even applies to a console whose market share distantly trailed that of the competing PS2). I ended up buying 37 GameCube racing/driving games; and I would’ve bought still more had I not opted to get certain cross-platform titles in originalXbox, Xbox 360, or PS2 format.

With those 37 GameCube discs plus 24 Wii racing/driving discs, my original-Wii console continues to deliver its share of fun whenever I’m taking a break from my much larger Xbox and PlayStation collections.

During the months when I was painstakingly building my American video games collections, I felt continually frustrated by the most widely disseminated, incomplete lists of “racing” titles for this or that particular system. Thus I hope my below — presumably comprehensive — list of recommendable GameCube racing/driving-game titles may be of help to some fellow collectors of this genre [though it’s possible I’ve overlooked a title or two that merit inclusion].

However, note that I have three key criteria determining (or at least influencing) which GameCube racing games ended up on the below list.

First, titles like “Driver” or “Grand Theft Auto” [which I myself neither play nor collect] are primarily role-playing, not racing, games. Thus I generally don’t include such games on the list.

Second, excessively puerile/adolescent/cartoony graphics, audio or themes normally don’t appeal to this adult gamer; so, you generally won’t find such titles on the list.]

Third, if a game simply incorporates hopelessly clumsy mechanics – or glaringly ineptly rendered audio/graphics – that keep me from enjoying the overall experience, that title is anathema ( is a prime example). [However, there’s a gray area, insofar as my below list does encompass a small minority of “borderline-acceptable” titles that somehow manage to amuse me enough to merit inclusion.]

As I’m American, my below list predictably comprises only NTSC editions; some games may bear different titles (or perhaps weren’t released) in other world regions. [Consult Wikipedia for details.]

Finally, my intention isn’t to discuss every game below; but the simple fact that these are the titles that made my list means each somehow merits a passing grade (though in several instances just a “D”). So, use the following list judiciously,  perhaps consulting pertinent reviews, articles or videos at the worthy Amazon, eBay, IGN, Wikipedia and YouTube to decide for yourself if a certain title belongs in your collection.

 

RECOMMENDABLE RETAIL GAMECUBE “RACING” GAMES RELEASED ON DISC IN NORTH AMERICA:

[Except where noted below, I own a GameCube-edition specimen of each of the following titles.]

(To view a picture of a particular game at Amazon, click its title.)

  1.      [Note: Be aware that the “car handling/steering” in this game (not only in this GameCube but also the virtually identical Xbox and PS2 editions, which I’ve likewise collected) is notoriously touchy/difficult! “Casual/occasional” gamers would do well to skip this title.]
  2. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this title.]
  3.   [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this title.]
  4.   [Note: I opted instead for the slightly graphically superior Xbox 360 edition of this game.]
  5.   [Note: I own not only this GameCube edition but also the PS2, whose gameplay content differs somewhat.]
  6. [Note: Regarding this late-2005 release, I sold my GameCube edition because I’d noticed that my Xbox 360 (likewise 2005) edition had sharper graphics. That said, this GameCube edition is still pretty nice in its own right.]

  7.   [Note: According to IGN, Smuggler’s Run: Warzones “is basically just (for PS2) with some additions and improvements.” Hence I opted to get this enhanced GameCube version and skip the PS2 release.]
  8.   [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this title.]
  9.   [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this title.]
  10.   [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this title.]
  11.   [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this title.]

Note: The following GameCube title is somewhat more a “combat-driving” than a “racing” game; nonetheless, I like it just enough to keep it in my collection.

Also note: The following two GameCube titles [both of which I opted to get in their (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox editions] are definitely more “combat-driving” than “racing” games, but they still might be of interest.

In this vein, the following GameCube title [which I opted to get in its PS2 edition] might likewise be of some interest.


 

*   *   *

You may also enjoy the following:  

The 81 Best RACING Games for Original Wii

The 135 Best RACING Games for Xbox 360

The 99 Best RACING Games for Original Xbox

The 292 Best RACING Games for PlayStation 2

The 121 Best RACING Games for PlayStation 1

The Best (Top 99) “RACING & DRIVING” Games for Original (First) Xbox Classic Console for Adults and Older Kids (Collector’s Complete List)

The ORIGINAL Xbox console, released in 2001
The ORIGINAL Xbox console, released on November 15, 2001

 

Pros: Numerous delightful racing/driving games were released for the original Xbox console; moreover, many such titles are also compatible with the Xbox 360 system, whose superior (HDMI) video output can make original-Xbox games look better than ever!

Cons: However, roughly 50% of all original-Xbox titles are not compatible with Xbox 360 consoles; therefore, note well my three separate lists below.

 

Preface  (Feel free to skip ahead to the lists of games.)

After getting my first Xbox 360 console ( whose price Walmart had steeply discounted) in 2013, I upgraded it by adding an . Not only was that hard drive a handy place to “install” Xbox 360 disc-based games (and thereby save wear and tear on the console’s optical-disc drive), but also it was downright necessary in order to play original-Xbox games via that “360” console.

I was surprised and delighted to discover just how great a supposedly “outmoded” original-Xbox game can look when played via my 360 console’s HDMI connection to the Samsung LCD TV on the game-room wall. For example, I was astounded by the incredibly sharp, vivid graphics of the excellent , which had been released way back in 2002.

And – since my favorite genre is “racing and driving” – I was keen to collect basically every “360-compatible” original-Xbox racing/driving game available. [I currently have 45 such original-Xbox titles (as shown in the first of three lists below), which nicely complement the 84 racing/driving titles I’ve got in Xbox-360 format.]

A few months ago (in spring 2015), I bought (from a trustworthy acquaintance) my first – and, so far, my only – “original-Xbox” console in nice condition. [Together with its included wired controller, that console looks just like the picture atop this review.] Naturally, I soon thereafter acquired a large handful of “360-incompatible” original-Xbox racing game discs that also happen to be “exclusive” to the original-Xbox console. (You can see those eleven titles in the second of the three lists below. So far, my favorite games in that batch are: Rallisport Challenge 2; MotoGP 3: Ultimate Racing Technology; and Furious Karting.)

During the months when I was painstakingly building my American video games collections, I felt continually frustrated by the most widely disseminated, incomplete lists of “racing” titles for this or that particular system. Thus I hope my below — presumably comprehensive — overall list of recommendable original-Xbox racing/driving-game titles may be of help to some fellow collectors of this genre [though it’s possible I’ve overlooked a title or two that merit inclusion].

However, note that I have three key criteria determining (or at least influencing) which original-Xbox racing games ended up on the below list.

First, titles like “Driver” or “Grand Theft Auto” [which I myself neither play nor collect] are primarily role-playing, not racing, games. Thus I generally don’t include such games on the list.

Second, excessively puerile/adolescent/cartoony graphics, audio or themes normally don’t appeal to this adult gamer; so, you generally won’t find such titles on the list.]

Third, if a game simply incorporates hopelessly clumsy mechanics – or glaringly ineptly rendered audio/graphics – that keep me from enjoying the overall experience, that title is anathema ( is a prime example). [However, there’s a gray area, insofar as my below list does encompass a small minority of “borderline-acceptable” titles that somehow manage to amuse me enough to merit inclusion.]

As I’m American, my below list predictably comprises only NTSC editions; some games may bear different titles (or perhaps weren’t released) in other world regions. [Consult Wikipedia for details.]

Finally, my intention isn’t to discuss every game below; but the simple fact that these are the titles that made my list means each somehow merits a passing grade (though in several instances just a “D”). So, use the following list judiciously,  perhaps consulting pertinent reviews, articles or videos at the worthy Amazon, eBay, IGN, Wikipedia and YouTube to decide for yourself if a certain title belongs in your collection.

 

RECOMMENDABLE RETAIL “ORIGINAL XBOX” RACING & DRIVING GAMES RELEASED ON DISC IN NORTH AMERICA

NOTE: I’ve divided my overall list into three shorter lists. The first list comprises original-Xbox games that can be played in Xbox 360 consoles (as well as original-Xbox consoles). The second list comprises games that can be played only in original-Xbox (not Xbox 360) consoles and weren’t released for any other console. And the third list comprises games that can be played in original-Xbox (but not Xbox 360) consoles and were released for at least one other competing console (such as the PlayStation 2 or GameCube).

LIST #1 (OF 3): “360-COMPATIBLE” ORIGINAL-XBOX RACING/DRIVING GAMES

[Note that your Xbox 360 console must not only have a hard drive installed but must also be online such that Microsoft can download the pertinent “emulation” file allowing your original-Xbox game disc to play via the Xbox 360 system. That emulation file is automatically downloaded and stored on the Xbox 360 console’s hard drive the first time you insert a 360-compatible original-Xbox game disc; thereafter, it won’t be necessary for that Xbox 360 console to be online in order to play that original-Xbox game.]

  1. 4×4 Evo 2      
  2. APEX      
  3. ATV Quad Power Racing 2      
  4. Auto Modellista            [Note: Be aware that the “car handling/steering” in this game (not only in this Xbox but also the virtually identical PS2 and GameCube editions, which I’ve likewise collected) is notoriously touchy/difficult! “Casual/occasional” gamers would do well to skip this title.]
  5. Burnout       
  6. Burnout 2: Point of Impact      
  7. Burnout 3: Takedown      
  8. Colin McRae Rally 04      
  9. Colin McRae Rally 2005      
  10. F1 2001     
  11. Flat Out      
  12. Ford Mustang Racing    
  13. Ford Vs. Chevy      
  14. Forza Motorsport      
  15. Grooverider: Slot Car Thunder      
  16. Hot Wheels: Stunt Track Challenge      
  17. IHRA Professional Drag Racing 2005      
  18. IHRA Drag Racing: Sportsman Edition          [Note: This game typically costs well over 20 dollars – not because it’s particularly good (it isn’t!) but simply because it’s relatively rare. Thus I chose to settle for the basically identical PS2 edition, which is dirt-cheap.]
  19. IndyCar Series 2005      
  20. Maximum Chase      
  21. MotoGP      
  22. MotoGP 2      
  23. MTX Mototrax      
  24. MX Unleashed      
  25. MX vs. ATV Unleashed      
  26. MX World Tour featuring Jamie Little      
  27. NASCAR Thunder 2002      
  28. NASCAR Thunder 2003      
  29. NASCAR 06: Total Team Control      
  30. Need for Speed Underground 2      
  31. Outrun 2      
  32. OutRun 2006: Coast 2 Coast          [Note: This game typically costs at least 30 dollars because it’s relatively rare. Thus I chose to settle for the basically identical PS2 edition, which can be found for well under 10 dollars.]
  33. Pocketbike Racer          
  34. Project Gotham Racing      
  35. Project Gotham Racing 2      
  36. Pro Race Driver      
  37. Quantum Redshift      
  38. Rallisport Challenge      
  39. SEGA GT 2002      
  40. Speed Kings      
  41. SSX 3      
  42. SX Superstar      
  43. Test Drive (2002)      
  44. Test Drive: Eve of Destruction      

Note: The following two “360-compatible” original-Xbox titles are more “combat-driving” than “racing” games, but they might nonetheless be of interest.

RoadKill      

Starsky And Hutch      

In this vein, the following “360-compatible” original-Xbox title might likewise be of some interest.

SpyHunter 2      

 

LIST #2 (OF 3): “NON-360-COMPATIBLE” ORIGINAL-XBOX RACING/DRIVING  GAMES THAT ARE “CONSOLE EXCLUSIVES”

  1. Carve      
  2. Chase: Hollywood Stunt Driver          [Note:  This game looks like a blatant imitation of the original “Stuntman” release for PlayStation 2. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing; so, if you’re a fan of the Stuntman games, definitely check out this Xbox game and decide if it’s for you.
  3. Crazy Taxi 3: High Roller         [Note: I opted to skip this game. Somewhat like the “original” Crazy Taxi (which I have for GameCube), this game strikes me as a tad too annoyingly adolescent; moreover, whatever “racing” there is, is simply “against the clock,” not “head to head.” That said, if you’re a fan of this series, definitely check out this installment via YouTube and decide if it’s for you.]
  4. Furious Karting      
  5. Group S Challenge      
  6. IHRA Drag Racing 2004      
  7. Midtown Madness 3      
  8. MotoGP 3: Ultimate Racing Technology      
  9. Room Zoom: Race for Impact   
  10. Rallisport Challenge 2      
  11. World Racing     
  12. World Racing 2     

 

LIST #3 (OF 3): “NON-360-COMPATIBLE” ORIGINAL-XBOX RACING/DRIVING  GAMES THAT ARE NOT “CONSOLE EXCLUSIVES”

I myself don’t own any of the following titles in “original-Xbox” format; instead, I own them all in other (generally PS2 or GameCube) formats. [My reasoning is that I’ve only got one original-Xbox console, but I’ve got several PS2 and (GameCube-compatible) original-Wii consoles; hence, I’d rather limit the amount of wear and tear on my sole original-Xbox-console specimen.] Nevertheless, for interested devotees/collectors of original-Xbox games, I’m providing the following list.

  1. (2005)

*    *    *

You may also enjoy the following:

The 135 Best RACING Games for Xbox 360

The 292 Best RACING Games for PlayStation 2

The 121 Best RACING Games for PlayStation 1

The 81 Best RACING Games for Original Wii

The 48 Best RACING Games for GameCube

The Best (Top 292) “RACING & DRIVING” Games Compatible with PlayStation 2 (PS2) for Adults and Older Kids (Collector’s Complete List)

Most recent version of the American (NTSC) PS2 console
One of the “Slim, black” versions of the North American (NTSC) PS2 console.  [Note:  The model SCPH-79001 CB has an EXTERNAL power supply. By contrast, the more recent model SCPH-90001 CB has an INTERNAL power supply.]

The "Ceramic White"(special-edition) version of the PS2 Slim console, which I use to play my PS1 games
The “Ceramic White” (special-edition model SCPH-79001 CW) PS2 Slim console, which I use to play my PS2 (and PS1) games. [Note:  My brand-new specimen didn’t come with the pictured “stand” that supports the console in the pictured, optional “vertical” position; hence I separately ordered that stand  from a different online vendor.]

 

Pros: The library of collectible, fun-to-play PS2-compatible “racing” games on disc is huge. And many titles are priced low.

Cons: Most of the extant PS3 consoles aren’t backward-compatible with PS2 games.  And with virtually all PS2 consoles, in order to “save” games, you’ll need to have at least one reliable “PS2 memory card”– preferably an original Sony-brand [or perhaps Nyko] card, because cheap “generic” cards are notoriously unreliable.

 

Preface  (Feel free to skip ahead to the lists of games.)

According to Wikipedia, the PlayStation 2 is

“… the best-selling video game console in history…. More than 3,874 game titles have been released for the PS2…, and more than 1.5 billion copies have been sold.”

Even factoring that the above-cited numbers of titles and sales pertain to the entire world (not just North America), it’s obvious that – 15 years after the PS2’s advent – American buyers of “racing and driving” games should have no trouble finding many affordable titles for their PS2 collections.

Even if no brick-and-mortar stores in your neighborhood still stock PS2 games, it’s generally easy to order such games online via Amazon, eBay, Half.com and other sites.

I didn’t own a PS2 console until January 2010. And I didn’t start collecting PS2 racing/driving games till 2013; but by now I’ve bought 124 such PS2 titles [plus 121 such titles in PS1 format, which is compatible with PS2 consoles]; and I would’ve bought still more PS2 racing games if I hadn’t already collected certain “cross-platform” titles in their GameCube, Wii, Xbox and/or Xbox 360 editions.

During the months when I was painstakingly building my American PS2 games collection, I felt continually frustrated by the most widely disseminated, incomplete lists of “racing” titles for this or that particular system. Thus I hope my below — presumably comprehensive — list of recommendable PS2 racing/driving-game titles may be of help to some fellow collectors of this genre [though it’s possible I’ve overlooked a title or two that merit inclusion].

However, note that I have three key criteria determining (or at least influencing) which PS2-compatible racing games ended up on the list (and in my personal collection).

First, titles like “Driver” or “Grand Theft Auto” [which I myself neither play nor collect] are primarily role-playing, not racing, games. Thus I generally don’t include such titles on this list.

Second, excessively puerile/adolescent/cartoony graphics, audio or themes normally don’t appeal to this adult gamer; so, you generally won’t find such titles on this list.

Third, if a game simply incorporates hopelessly clumsy mechanics – or glaringly ineptly rendered audio/graphics – that keep me from enjoying the overall experience, that title is anathema. [Here too, however, there’s a gray area, insofar as my below list does encompass a small minority of “borderline-acceptable” titles that somehow manage to amuse me enough to merit inclusion.

As I’m American, my below list predictably comprises only NTSC editions; some games may bear different titles (or perhaps weren’t released) in other world regions. [Consult Wikipedia for details.]

Finally, my intention isn’t to discuss every game below; but the simple fact that these are the titles that made my list means each somehow merits a passing grade (though in several instances just a “D”). So, use the following list judiciously,  perhaps consulting pertinent reviews, articles or videos at the worthy Amazon, eBay, IGN, Wikipedia and YouTube to decide for yourself if a certain title belongs in your collection.

RECOMMENDABLE RETAIL PS2 “RACING” GAMES RELEASED ON DISC IN NORTH AMERICA:

[Except where noted below, I own a PS2-edition specimen of each of the following titles.]

(To view a picture of a particular game at Amazon, click its title.)

  1. [Note: I opted instead for the (Wii-compatible) GameCube edition of this game.]
  2.   [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  3.      [Note: Be aware that the “car handling/steering” in this game (not only in this PS2 but also the virtually identical Xbox and GameCube editions, which I’ve likewise collected) is notoriously touchy/difficult! “Casual/occasional” gamers would do well to skip this title.]
  4. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  5. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  6. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  7.    [Note: I opted instead for the graphically superior Xbox 360 edition of this game.]
  8. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  9. [Note: I opted instead for the (Wii-compatible) GameCube edition of this game.]
  10. (2008)
  11. (2002)
  12. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  13. [Note: I opted instead for the improved 2008 re-release of this game for Xbox 360, titled .]
  14. [Note: I opted instead for the (Wii-compatible) GameCube edition of this game.]
  15. [Note: I opted instead for the graphically superior Xbox 360 edition of this game.]
  16. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  17. [Note: I opted instead for the (Wii-compatible) GameCube edition of this game.]
  18. [Note: I opted instead for the graphically superior Xbox 360 edition of this game.]
  19. [Note: Don’t confuse this PS2 game with the similarly titled original-Xbox release  (which is a distinct– and, by the way, not “360-compatible” — game that I play solely via my original-Xbox console).]
  20.   [Note: Unlike the somewhat similar PS2 game , this game doesn’t offer competitive bicycle racing. But its “stopwatch” mode does offer some seemingly more realistic against-the-clock solo racing, which real-world mountain-bike riders would probably appreciate more than would most casual gamers.]
  21. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  22. [Note: I opted instead for the (Wii-compatible) GameCube edition of this game.]
  23. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  24. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  25. [Note: I opted instead for the Wii and Xbox 360 editions of this game.]
  26. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  27. [Note: I own not only this excellent PS2 edition but also the very similar Wii-compatible GameCube.]
  28. [Note: I own not only this PS2 edition but also the GameCube, whose gameplay content differs somewhat.]
  29. [Note: I opted instead for the (Wii-compatible) GameCube edition of this game.]
  30. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  31. [Note: I opted instead for the Xbox 360 edition of this 2005 game.]
  32. [Note: I opted instead for the Xbox 360 edition of this game.]
  33. [Note: I opted instead for the Xbox 360 edition of this game.]
  34. [Note: I opted instead for the Xbox 360 edition of this game.]
  35.   [This is a 2005 release. Also see (directly below) its superior 2007 sequel.]
  36. [I prefer the bike control (“steering”) in this PS2 edition to that of the Wii edition (which I likewise own).]
  37. [Note: I opted instead for the (Wii-compatible) GameCube edition of this game.]
  38. [Note: I opted instead for the (Wii-compatible) GameCube edition of this game.]
  39. [Note: I opted instead for the Xbox 360 edition of this game.]
  40. [Note: I opted instead for the Xbox 360 edition of this game.]
  41. [Note: According to IGN, (for GameCube) “is basically just ‘Hostile Territory’ with some additions and improvements.” Hence I opted to skip this PS2 release and get the enhanced GameCube version.]
  42. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  43. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  44. [Note: I opted instead for the (Wii-compatible) GameCube edition of this game.]
  45. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  46. [Note: When played in its “career/season” mode, the PS2 edition of this little low-budget game really entertains me– as does the Wii edition, which utilizes the Wiimote’s “motion-control steering” surprisingly effectively.]
  47. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  48. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this game.]
  49. [Note: I opted instead for the Xbox 360 edition of this game.]
  50. [Note: I opted instead for the (Wii-compatible) GameCube edition of this game.]
  51. [Note: I opted instead for the (Wii-compatible) GameCube edition of this game.]

Note: The following PS2 title is somewhat more a “combat-driving” than a “racing” game. [I opted instead for its (Wii-compatible) GameCube edition.]

Also note: The following two PS2 titles [both of which I opted to get in their “Xbox 360-compatible,” original-Xbox editions] are definitely more “combat-driving” than “racing” games, but they still might be of interest.

     

Also note that there are two “Stuntman” titles available for PS2, including the 2002 PS2-exclusive debut , and the 2007 sequel [which I opted to get in Xbox 360 format]. While I do admire certain things about those “Stuntman” titles, I’m reluctant to characterize them as “racing” games or to declare them highly recommendable for the majority of players. But I do suggest that you consult several YouTube videos/reviews to help you decide if the PS2 “Stuntman” series is for you.

(PS2-COMPATIBLE) PS1 RACING GAMES

Of course, in addition to all the above PS2-format game discs, a PS2 console can play essentially any “original PlayStation” (PS1) game disc. [Thus the total number of recommendable PS2-compatible North American (NTSC) racing and driving games is actually around 292!]

To see my complete list of such PS1 racing titles, click the following link:

The 121 Best RACING Games for PS1

 

*    *    *

You may also enjoy the following:

The 99 Best RACING Games for Original Xbox

The 48 Best RACING Games for GameCube

The 81 Best RACING Games for Nintendo Wii

The 135 Best RACING Games for Xbox 360

 

The Best (Top 81) “RACING & DRIVING” Games Compatible with Original Nintendo Wii Console for Adults and Older Kids (Collector’s Complete List)

The GameCube-compatible Wii console that I bought in January 2010
The GameCube-compatible Wii console that I bought in January 2010.  Note: I’ve got this connected to an LCD TV via a component-video cable. (Using a “component” — instead of the standard “composite” — cable noticeably improves picture quality for not only Wii but also GameCube games.

Wii console with Mario Kart
Alternatively available, this bundle includes not only the GameCube-compatible Wii console but also the “Mario Kart Wii” game plus a “wheel” (“motion-control” accessory) that can also be used with many other Wii racing/driving games.

 

Pros: Numerous racing titles are compatible with the original Wii console.

Cons: But the plethora of “shovelware” and “hard-to-steer” games compels the discriminating player/collector to cull the wheat from the chaff.

 

Preface (Feel free to skip ahead to the list of games. )

While the original Wii isn’t exactly renowned as a racing or driving platform, many compatible — and enjoyable — racing games do exist, especially for its earlier console models incorporating GameCube compatibility.

As you likely know, the original Wii’s own library of games is deservedly notorious for the plethora of low-quality, “shovelware” titles. Removing such lowly games from consideration still leaves you with the fact that no cross-platform driving/racing title for Wii is likely to be as graphically impressive as its counterpart for the contemporaneous Xbox 360 or PlayStation 3 system.

Moreover, more than a few otherwise promising games implement the Wii’s controversial “motion-control” approach to steering your vehicle, etc. Now, with certain titles that approach does work splendidly or at least tolerably well (especially if you temporarily place the standard Wii controller — aka “Wiimote” — within a passive “wheel” device, such as the one made by Nintendo). But far too many other titles implement motion control so badly that it’s a veritable deal breaker to almost any player – especially considering that such games often provide no alternative control choices (i.e., no Nunchuk, GameCube or Classic controller option). [In this vein, it may be helpful to consult Wikipedia’s pertinent lists regarding which Wii games are compatible with this or that type of controller.]

One example of a Wii game that implements “motion-control steering” frustratingly badly is . My Xbox 360 [and, presumably, the PlayStation 3] edition has much more manageable steering. A second such example is the game . My PlayStation 2 edition’s steering is all right; but the Wii edition’s steering is intolerably bad.

Note that I have three key criteria determining (or at least influencing) which Wii-compatible racing games ended up on the list (and in my personal collection).

First, titles like “Driver” [which I myself neither play nor collect] are primarily role-playing, not racing, games. Thus I generally don’t include such titles on this list.

Second, excessively puerile/adolescent/cartoony graphics, audio or themes normally don’t appeal to this adult gamer; so, you generally won’t find such titles on this list. [But I’ve no such compunctions about certain seemingly universally beloved kart-racing titles – like the ones involving “Mario” or “Sonic” – that don’t unduly annoy adult sensibility.]

Third, if a game simply incorporates hopelessly clumsy mechanics – or glaringly ineptly rendered audio/graphics – that keep me from enjoying the overall experience, that title is anathema. [Here too, however, there’s a gray area, insofar as my below list does encompass a minority of “borderline-acceptable” titles that somehow manage to amuse me enough to merit inclusion.

Note:  I’m American. Unsurprisingly, my below list comprises NTSC editions; some games may bear different titles (or perhaps weren’t released) in other world regions. [Consult Wikipedia for details.]

Finally, my intention isn’t to discuss every game below; but the simple fact that these are the titles that made my list means each somehow merits a passing grade (though in several instances just a “D+”). So, use the following list judiciously,  perhaps consulting pertinent reviews, articles or videos at the worthy Amazon, eBay, IGN, Wikipedia and YouTube to decide for yourself if a certain title belongs in your collection.

RECOMMENDABLE RETAIL NINTENDO Wii “RACING” GAMES RELEASED ON DISC IN NORTH AMERICA:

[Except where noted below, I myself own the Wii edition of each of the following titles.]

(To view a picture of a particular game, click its “See it at Amazon” link.)

  1. Bigfoot: Collision Course      
  2. Big Foot: King of Crush      
  3. Build’n Race          [This game is pretty much “shovelware,” but (with the option to steer via the Nunchuk) it actually ends up providing a bit of fun and challenge using the various pre-built tracks. However, you must learn to ignore (or simply snort/chuckle at) the intermittent pollyannaish “encouragement” of the female commentator.]
  4. Cruis’n         [This game was originally going to be titled The Fast and the Furious. (Otherwise, it has no relation or similarity to the latter title for PS2.)]
  5. Dodge Racing: Charger vs. Challenger      
  6. Ferrari Challenge      
  7. ExciteBots: Trick Racing      
  8. ExciteTruck      
  9. F1 2009          [This title is essentially a Wii exclusive (not counting the PSP and iOS versions). Moreover, it’s actually a respectably decent “F1″ game (factoring the Wii’s graphical limitations) that lets you use several alternative-control options (involving the Nunchuk or the Classic controller).]
  10. GT Pro Series          [Evidently this 2006 launch title was largely a port of the 2003 Japan-only GameCube title GT Cube. Most critics roundly disparaged this Wii release; but I think it’s actually pretty good (for a Wii game), what with its decent implementation of Wiimote motion control.]
  11. Honda ATV Fever              [Warning: Though the graphics and steering (with the Nunchuk, not the Wiimote!) are decent, this game’s difficulty level (AI) is set so unreasonably high that — so far — I’ve been lucky to finish a race in sixth or seventh place (out of eight competing racers). Frankly, if frequently winning is important to you, you’d do well to skip this title.
  12. Hot Wheels Track Attack      
  13. Indianapolis 500 Legends      
  14. Mario Kart Wii      
  15. Maximum Racing: Drag & Stock Racer        [Note: To me this low-budget game — which does allow Nunchuk steering — is desirable primarily because of its “stock” car racing mode. Important: The instructions manual doesn’t mention the necessity to select (from the menu) the “stock high” (instead of the default “stock low“) option. (Unless you select “high,” the game is essentially worthless because your car won’t be nearly fast enough to keep up with any of the 15 “AI” cars!)
  16. Monster Jam       [Note: I opted to get this title in its (presumably graphically superior) Xbox 360 edition instead of this Wii (which, in its own right, has garnered mostly favorable reviews).]
  17. Monster Jam: Path Of Destruction         [Note: I opted to get this title in its (presumably graphically superior) Xbox 360 edition instead of this Wii (which, in its own right, has garnered mostly favorable reviews).]
  18. Monster Jam: Urban Assault [I own not only this Wii edition but also the PS2, whose racing details differ somewhat. (Feel free to consult YouTube to compare the two.)      
  19. MX vs. ATV Untamed      [Note: So far, I actually prefer this Wii edition to the Xbox 360 (which I likewise own).]
  20. NASCAR Kart Racing      
  21. NASCAR The Game 2011      
  22. Need for Speed: Nitro           [Note: This is the only “Wii-exclusive” NFS game (and thus the only NFS title that I opted to get for my Wii console). But the following five additional NFS titles are likewise available for Wii: “;” “;”  “;” “;” and “.” So, if you don’t have access to the presumably superior Xbox 360 or PlayStation 3 editions of those five titles, you might opt to settle for the (presumably tolerably good) Wii versions.]
  23. Nitrobike         [I own not only this Wii but also the PS2 edition. The latter version’s control (steering) is preferable; nonetheless, this Wii is “okay,” provided you can find it cheap (I paid slightly under two bucks).]
  24. Rig Racer 2             This “shovelware” Wii title is just good enough to make my list. I find it rather amusing in that it involves strictly “big-rig” trucks racing and doesn’t take itself seriously. [Besides, it cost me only 99 cents at a GameStop store.] This game uses only the Wiimote in “motion-control” mode; however, that approach is implemented surprisingly well in this little game — especially if you temporarily place the Wiimote in a Mariokart type of “wheel” (accessory). Be sure to select the “easy” difficulty level; and note that the Wiimote’s “–” (minus sign) key is for “reverse,” which you’ll likely be needing, now and again, till you’ve mastered your truck’s steering and braking.
  25. Sonic & Sega All-Stars Racing         [I opted to get this title in its (presumably graphically superior) Xbox 360 edition instead of this Wii (which, in its own right, has garnered mostly favorable reviews).]
  26. Speed Racer         [I opted to get this title in its PS2 edition instead of this Wii (which supports only the Wiimote– not the Nunchuk, GameCube or Classic controller).]
  27. Speed Zone              [This game’s compatible with not only the Wiimote but also the Nunchuk, GameCube, and Classic controller. (With this game, forget the Wiimote and Nunchuk and instead use the GameCube or maybe the Classic controller!)]
  28. Super PickUps         [Call this low-budget release “shovelware” if you must, but I personally love this little game! I had already owned (and likewise relished) the PS2 edition before taking a chance on this Wii version, which – to my surprise and delight – actually implements the standard Wii controller’s motion-control mode more than tolerably nicely. Tip: For the best gameplay experience, select the initial menu’s “career” (instead of “quick race”) option, and then select “Season.” You’ll thereby see an onscreen “nitro boost” meter that makes for a much more lastingly satisfying challenge.]

 

(Wii-COMPATIBLE) GAMECUBE RACING GAMES

Until October 2011, all original Wii consoles sold in America were backward-compatible with Nintendo GameCube game discs. As of this writing, unused GameCube-compatible Wii consoles are still being sold at tolerably affordable prices (e.g., about $200, including shipping, via Amazon.com). [See the two pertinent pictures/links at the top of this review.]

[Except where noted below, I own a GameCube-edition specimen of each of the following titles.]

(To view a picture of a particular game at Amazon, click its title.)

  1.      [Note: Be aware that the “car handling/steering” in this game (not only in this GameCube but also the virtually identical Xbox and PS2 editions, which I’ve likewise collected) is notoriously touchy/difficult! “Casual/occasional” gamers would do well to skip this title.]
  2. [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this title.]
  3.   [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this title.]
  4. [Note: I opted instead for the slightly graphically superior Xbox 360 edition of this game.]
  5. [Note: I sold my copy of this late-2005 game after noticing that my Xbox 360 edition of it had sharper graphics. That said, this GameCube edition is still pretty nice in its own right.]

  6.   [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this title.]
  7.   [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this title.]
  8.   [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this title.]
  9.   [Note: I opted instead for the (Xbox 360-compatible) original-Xbox edition of this title.]

Note: The following GameCube title is somewhat more a “combat-driving” than a “racing” game; nonetheless, I like it just enough to keep it in my collection.

Also note: The following two GameCube titles [both of which I opted to get in their “Xbox 360-compatible,” original-Xbox editions] are definitely more “combat-driving” than “racing” games, but they still might be of interest.

In this vein, the following GameCube title [which I opted to get in its PS2 edition] might likewise be of some interest.

 

*   *   *

You may also enjoy the following:  

The 48 Best RACING Games for GameCube

The 134 Best RACING Games for Xbox 360

The 95 Best RACING Games for Original Xbox

The 291 Best RACING Games for PlayStation 2

The 121 Best RACING Games for Original PlayStation (PS1)

 

The Best (Top 135) “RACING & DRIVING” Games Compatible with Xbox 360 for Adults and Older Kids (Collector’s Complete List)

Left: The "Special-Edition" WHITE Xbox 360 Slim console that I bought in 2013. Note: I quickly upgraded this console by adding an official Microsoft 250GB hard drive.
Left: The “Special-Edition” WHITE Xbox 360 Slim console that I bought new (at Walmart) in 2013 for a net cost (after selling the bundled, unwanted “Skylanders” stuff) of only $159.  Note: I upgraded that console by installing an official Microsoft hard drive. ( is most highly recommended for collectors. But save money by not ordering it directly from Microsoft but instead via ! Also note; The specimen that I received via an Amazon Marketplace seller came in a Microsoft product box stating “PAL” region; nevertheless, it works fully normally in my North American [NTSC] console.)

 

Pros: Today many Xbox 360 games can be collected (as used specimens) at affordable prices. The quality of “360” games still compares pretty nicely with that of games for “eighth-generation” consoles (e.g., Xbox One or PlayStation 4).

Cons: Think twice about buying any “downloadable” games (via Xbox LIVE) for your Xbox 360 console. (I’ll explain why below.)

 

Preface  (Feel free to skip ahead to the list of games)

It wasn’t till 2013 that I got my first Xbox 360 console. By having waited so long after the console’s 2005 advent, I was able to buy three brand-new “Slim” consoles (in my preferred special-edition white hue) – each including a white, wireless controller – for scarcely more than what I would’ve originally paid for just one unreliable “deluxe” console. [Some might wonder why I bought more than just one Xbox 360 specimen. Well, on the one hand, I like knowing that I’ll almost certainly be able to play at least one of those consoles for the next two decades, i.e., years after one or two of ‘em have probably stopped working. On the other hand, I could end up selling one or both of the “backup” consoles someday as “still new, tested” specimens.]

Moreover, waiting so long to leap aboard the “360” bandwagon enabled me to purchase most of my compatible games at significantly discounted prices.

Note that I do have three key criteria determining (or at least influencing) which games ended up on the list (and in my personal collection).

First, titles like “Driver;” “Grand Theft Auto,” and “Fast and Furious” [which I myself neither play nor collect] are primarily role-playing, not racing, games. Thus I generally don’t include such titles on this list.

Second, excessively puerile/adolescent/cartoony graphics, audio or themes normally don’t appeal to this adult gamer; so, you generally won’t find such titles on this list. [But I’ve no such compunctions about certain seemingly universally beloved kart-racing titles – like the ones involving “Sonic” – that don’t unduly annoy adult sensibility.]

Third, if a game absolutely forces me to be connected to the Internet in order to play it, I will neither buy nor endorse that game! [Hence you won’t find The Crew (a late-2014 release) on my list.]

Note:  I’m American. Unsurprisingly, my below list comprises (with two qualified exceptions, i.e., F1 2013 and WRC 2) only NTSC editions. And some games may bear different titles (or perhaps weren’t released) in other world regions. [Consult Wikipedia for details.]

Finally, my general intention isn’t to discuss any particular game below; but the simple fact that these are the titles that made my list means each somehow merits a passing grade (though in several instances just a “D+”). So, use the following list judiciously,  perhaps consulting pertinent reviews, articles or videos at the worthy Amazon, eBay, IGN, Wikipedia and YouTube to decide for yourself if a certain title belongs in your collection.

NOTE:  I’ve divided my overall list into three shorter lists. The first list comprises ordinary retail (on-disc) Xbox 360 games. The second list comprises several “downloadable” Xbox 360 games. And the third list comprises retail on-disc games that were released for the original (2001) Xbox console yet are compatible with any North American Xbox 360 console having an official, Microsoft-brand hard drive.

COLLECTIBLE RETAIL XBOX 360 “RACING” GAMES RELEASED ON DISC (DVD) IN NORTH AMERICA:

(To view a picture of a particular game, click its “See it at Amazon” link.)

  1. Baja: Edge of Control      
  2. Blood Drive       
  3. Blur       
  4. Burnout Paradise       
  5. Burnout Revenge      
  6. Dirt      
  7. Dirt 2      
  8. Dirt 3      
  9. Dirt Showdown      
  10. F1 2010      
  11. F1 2011      
  12. F1 2012      
  13. F1 2013            [Note: This particular title’s British (PAL) edition is “region-free,” i.e., fully compatible with North American (NTSC) consoles. (As of this writing, you can order via Amazon.com either the PAL edition [the one I myself own] or the much pricier NTSC equivalent.)]
  14. F1 2014      
  15. F1 Race Stars      
  16. Fatal Inertia      
  17. Flat Out: Ultimate Carnage      
  18. Forza Horizon      
  19. Forza Horizon 2      
  20. Forza Motorsport 2      
  21. Forza Motorsport 3      
  22. Forza Motorsport 4      
  23. Fuel      
  24. Full Auto      
  25. Grid       
  26. Grid 2      
  27. Grid Autosport (“Black Edition”)      
    [Note:  Might as well get this expanded “Black” edition (which includes an extra car, etc.), since — ironically — it’s available for less than the cost of the “Standard” edition.]
  28. Hot Wheels: Beat That      
  29. Import Tuner Challenge      
  30. Indianapolis 500 Evolution      
  31. Jimmie Johnson’s Anything with an Engine      
  32. Juiced 2: Hot Import Nights       
  33. Mayhem 3D      
  34. Midnight Club: Los Angeles – Complete Edition      
  35. Monster Jam      
  36. Monster Jam: Path of Destruction      
  37. MotoGP 06      
  38. MotoGP 07      
  39. MotoGP 08      
  40. MotoGP 09/10      
  41. MotoGP 14      
  42. MUD: FIM Motocross World Championship      
  43. MXGP: The Official Motocross Videogame      
  44. MX vs. ATV Alive      
  45. MX vs. ATV Reflex      
  46. MX vs. ATV Untamed      
  47. Mx vs. ATV: Supercross      
  48. Nail’d      
  49. NASCAR 08      
  50. NASCAR 09      
  51. NASCAR The Game 2011      
  52. NASCAR: Unleashed      
  53. NASCAR The Game: Inside Line      
  54. NASCAR ’14     
  55. Need for Speed: Most Wanted (2005)      
  56. Need for Speed: Carbon (2006)      
  57. Need for Speed: ProStreet (2007)      
  58. Need for Speed: Undercover (2008)      
  59. Need for Speed: Shift (2009)      
  60. Need For Speed: Hot Pursuit (2010)      
  61. (Need For Speed) Shift 2: Unleashed (2011)      
  62. Need for Speed: The Run (2011)      
  63. Need for Speed: Most Wanted (2012)      
  64. Need for Speed: Rivals (2013)      
  65. PocketBike Racer     
  66. Project Gotham Racing 3      
  67. Project Gotham Racing 4      
  68. Pure      
  69. Race Pro      
  70. Ridge Racer 6      
  71. Ridge Racer Unbounded      
  72. SBK Superbike World Championship      
  73. SBK X: Superbike World Championship      
  74. Score International: BAJA 1000      
  75. Sega Rally Revo      
  76. Ski Doo: Snowmobile Challenge      
  77. Sonic and All-Stars Racing Transformed      
  78. Sonic & Sega All-Stars Racing      
  79. Split/Second      
  80. SSX      
  81. Stuntman: Ignition      
  82. Test Drive: Ferrari Racing Legends      
  83. Test Drive Unlimited       
  84. Test Drive Unlimited 2      
  85. World of Outlaws: Sprint Cars      
  86. WRC 2: FIA World Rally Championship         [Note: Although this 2011 game wasn’t released in North America, its British “PAL” edition is (unlike all other Xbox 360 PAL editions in the WRC series) “region-free” and thus can be played on North American “NTSC” Xbox 360 consoles. I ordered my preowned copy via Amazon.com’s link to their “United Kingdom” website for $14.89 USD (including shipping from England to USA).]

DOWNLOADABLE RACING GAMES

Note that several excellent racing games are also available – strictly as downloads – via Microsoft’s “Xbox Live.” Apart from Daytona USA (whose demo wasn’t quite impressive enough to convince me to buy the full game), the following three titles are noteworthy (and I enjoy them all very much):

  1. Hydro Thunder Hurricane
  2. Jeremy McGrath’s Offroad
  3. SkyDrift

[However, if lasting value matters to you, heed my warning (in the addendum below) regarding buying any downloadable games for your Xbox 360 console!]

“ORIGINAL XBOX” RACING GAMES COMPATIBLE WITH XBOX 360 CONSOLES

Many (but not all!) racing games for the original Xbox console (released in 2001) are likewise compatible with any Xbox 360 console having an official, Microsoft-brand hard drive. [Flash memory/thumb drives don’t work with original-Xbox games; moreover, third-party/generic, non-Microsoft hard drives reportedly won’t work reliably, if at all, so don’t even try that!] Thus I’m also providing the below list of the 43 original-Xbox racing titles that I deem worth keeping in my “360” collection (and which generally look better than ever via my 360 console’s HDMI connection to a modern TV).

[Also note that your Xbox 360 console must initially be online such that Microsoft can download the pertinent “emulation” file allowing your original-Xbox game disc to play via the Xbox 360 system. That emulation file is automatically downloaded and stored on the Xbox 360 console’s hard drive the first time you insert a 360-compatible original-Xbox game disc; thereafter, it won’t be necessary for that Xbox 360 console to be online in order to play that original-Xbox game.]

RETAIL “ORIGINAL XBOX” RACING GAMES RELEASED ON DISC IN NORTH AMERICA (AND COMPATIBLE WITH NORTH AMERICAN XBOX 360 CONSOLES):

  1. 4×4 Evo 2      
  2. APEX      
  3. ATV Quad Power Racing 2      
  4. Auto Modellista         [Note: Be aware that the “car handling/steering” in this game (not only in this Xbox but also the virtually identical GameCube and PS2 editions, which I’ve likewise collected) is notoriously touchy/difficult! “Casual/occasional” gamers would do well to skip this title.]
  5. Burnout       
  6. Burnout 2: Point of Impact      
  7. Burnout 3: Takedown      
  8. Colin McRae Rally 04      
  9. Colin McRae Rally 2005      
  10. F1 2001     
  11. Flat Out      
  12. Ford Mustang Racing    
  13. Ford Vs. Chevy      
  14. Forza Motorsport      
  15. Grooverider: Slot Car Thunder      
  16. Hot Wheels: Stunt Track Challenge      
  17. IHRA Professional Drag Racing 2005      
  18. IHRA Drag Racing: Sportsman Edition          [Note: This game typically costs well over 20 dollars – not because it’s particularly good (it isn’t!) but simply because it’s relatively rare. Thus I chose to settle for the basically identical PS2 edition, which is dirt-cheap.]
  19. IndyCar Series 2005      
  20. Maximum Chase      
  21. MotoGP      
  22. MotoGP 2      
  23. MTX Mototrax      
  24. MX Unleashed      
  25. MX vs. ATV Unleashed      
  26. MX World Tour featuring Jamie Little      
  27. NASCAR Thunder 2002      
  28. NASCAR Thunder 2003      
  29. NASCAR 06: Total Team Control      
  30. Need for Speed Underground 2      
  31. Outrun 2      
  32. OutRun 2006: Coast 2 Coast          [Note: This game typically costs at least 30 dollars because it’s relatively rare. Thus I chose to settle for the basically identical PS2 edition, which can be found for well under 10 dollars.]
  33. Project Gotham Racing      
  34. Project Gotham Racing 2      
  35. Pro Race Driver      
  36. Quantum Redshift      
  37. Rallisport Challenge      
  38. SEGA GT 2002      
  39. Speed Kings      
  40. SSX 3      
  41. SX Superstar      
  42. Test Drive (2002)      
  43. Test Drive: Eve of Destruction      

Note: The following two “360-compatible” original-Xbox titles are more “combat-driving” than “racing” games, but they might nonetheless be of interest.

RoadKill      

Starsky And Hutch      

In this vein, the following “360-compatible” original-Xbox title might likewise be of some interest.

SpyHunter 2      

 

Addendum

Warning:  The three downloadable games that I cited above [Hydro Thunder Hurricane; Jeremy McGrath’s Off-Road; and SkyDrift) arguably don’t constitute good long-term value, because once your “primary” console breaks — and Xbox Live support for Xbox 360 is eventually terminated (as Microsoft did in early 2010 for the original Xbox console) — your precious downloads will effectively disappear!

[Note: An acquaintance of mine recently mused that it’s conceivable Microsoft might, upon terminating Xbox 360 support, provide some compensatory means for any past purchaser of such downloaded games to freely play his downloads on Xbox 360 consoles other than his “primary” (original) one. But I believe that’s merely wishful thinking, because past history suggests it just “ain’t gonna happen.”]

Admittedly, “for the time being” I’m still relishing the ninety-five dollars’ worth of superlative games (including some non-racing, “arcade” titles) that I downloaded from Xbox Live. Even so, I’m also increasingly feeling that I impulsively made a ninety-five-buck mistake. And I sure won’t be shelling out for any more such downloads.

*   *   *

You may also enjoy the following:  

The 99 Best RACING Games for Original Xbox

The 292 Best RACING Games for PlayStation 2

The 121 Best RACING Games for PlayStation 1

The 81 Best RACING Games for Original Wii

The 48 Best RACING Games for GameCube

 

The Best (Top 121) “RACING & DRIVING” Games for Original PlayStation (PS1/PSX) for Adults and Older Kids (Collector’s Complete List)

ps1 console
The redesigned, smaller version of the original PlayStation console

The "Ceramic White"(special-edition) version of the PS2 Slim console, which I use to play my PS1 games
The “Ceramic White” (special-edition) version of the PS2 Slim console, which I opt to use to play all my PS1 games — including the “racing” titles on my below list. [Note: Presumably, PS1 games could look still nicer via a PS3 console (with its HDMI connectivity), but I haven’t personally verified this.]

 

Pros:  Used PS1 racing games are generally quite affordable and easy to find via trustworthy online vendors (e.g., Amazon and eBay). And there are well over a hundred PS1 racing titles – which are compatible with all PS2 and (presumably) PS3 consoles.

Cons:  Fifth-generation-console racing games’ graphics arguably aren’t as exciting as their counterparts for more recent systems. And many PS1 racing games don’t provide “analog-thumbstick” steering (as a control option to “digital D-pad” steering).

 

Preface  (Feel free to skip ahead to my list of game titles.)

Edgar Rice Burroughs once defined golf as a mental disorder. Similarly, I myself – only partly jestingly – have long defined collecting as a species of mania. All my life I’ve been afflicted with this recurring madness. In youth I focused on philately. But in adulthood I’ve settled on books, music, and video games. I find those three subjects ultimately more gratifying than stamps, coins or cards. For not only can I passively behold my sundry objects ranged alphabetically on display shelves, but also I can open or play any single title and lose myself within a captivating alternate reality.

While my taste in music and books might seem stodgy (I collect primarily “classical” and “nonfiction”) my taste in videogaming is more wide-ranging. That said, I favor the following genres: arcade; shmups; and racing. Of the three, my favorite, by far, is racing— in virtually any form, not just the usual “cars, trucks or bikes.”

During the months when I was painstakingly building my (arguably definitive) American racing-games collection, I felt continually frustrated by the most widely disseminated, incomplete lists of “racing” titles for any of my several old consoles— including the PlayStation 2 (which is PS1-compatible). [Note:  PlayStation 3 consoles are likewise backwardly compatible with most PS1 games. However, I myself don’t presently own a PS3.]

Thus I hope my below — presumably comprehensive — list of recommendable PS1 racing-game titles may be of help to some fellow collectors of this genre [though it’s possible I’ve overlooked a title or two that merit inclusion].

However, I do have three key criteria determining (or at least influencing) which titles made my list.

First, titles like Driver or Grand Theft Auto [which I myself neither play nor collect] are primarily role-playing, not racing, games. Thus I generally don’t include such titles on this list.

Second, excessively puerile/adolescent/cartoony graphics, audio or themes (in games like Crash Team Racing and Twisted Metal) normally don’t appeal to this adult gamer. [But I’ve no such problem with certain seemingly universally beloved kart-racing titles involving Pac-Man, Kirby, Mario and Sonic that were released for later consoles and scarcely annoy adult sensibility.]

Third, if a game simply incorporates hopelessly clumsy mechanics – or glaringly ineptly rendered audio/graphics – that keep me from enjoying the overall experience, that title is anathema. [Here too, however, there’s a gray area, insofar as my below list does encompass a minority of “borderline-acceptable” titles that somehow manage to amuse me enough to merit inclusion.

Note:  I’m American. Unsurprisingly, my below list comprises only NTSC editions. And some games bear different titles (or weren’t released) in other world regions. [Consult Wikipedia for details.]

Finally, my general intention isn’t to discuss any particular game below; but the simple fact that these are the titles that made my list means each somehow merits a passing grade (though in some instances just a “D”). So, use the following list judiciously,  perhaps consulting pertinent reviews, articles or videos at the worthy Amazon, eBay, IGN, Wikipedia and YouTube to decide for yourself if a certain title belongs in your collection. 

[To see a particular game at Amazon, click its picture or title.]

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37.      [Note:  This relatively weak game only barely qualified for this list!]

 

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53.       [Note:  Mine is the slightly expanded “” The (not shown below) has different cover art.]

 

54.       [Mine is the standard edition (as shown below). Also available is a (presumably slightly expanded) “.”]

 

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56.     (’96 Season)

 

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Need for Speed III Hot Pursuit

 

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98.     [Note:  This game — whose cutscenes overshadow its actual “racing” segments — only barely qualified for this list!]

 

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118.    [Note: This “original” Wipeout game is a noteworthy title for PS1 collectors; however, my take is that its gameplay’s relative shortcomings make it seem altogether superfluous for gamers who already own any of its superior sequels, including Wipeout XL and/or Wipeout 3.]

 

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121.      [Note:  This relatively weak game only barely qualified for this list!]

 

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You may also enjoy the following:  

The 292 Best RACING Games for PlayStation 2

The 99 Best RACING Games for Original Xbox

The 48 Best RACING Games for GameCube

The 81 Best RACING Games for Original Wii

The 135 Best RACING Games for Xbox 360

Vintage and works great

Alladin Stanley® Vacuum Bottle

jpg

(5/5)

Pros: made to last, and it does

Cons: heavy for arthritic hands

My vintage, American made, Alladin Stanley® vacuum bottle is a well-made, dandy of a vaccum bottle. My dad carried a glass lined thermos bottle in his lunch box for years so my experience with the Alladin Stanley vacuum bottle was limited, I did see a few during childhood but had no idea what they were, or how handy.

Dad’s thermos suffered a broken liner now and again, the liner was replaceable.

My children are Lads, Boy Scouting became a major experience in our lives for many years, kids were cubbies and continued in the program through Webelo and Scouts. I became an adult Scouter and noticed many fellow scouters, generally older men carrying the Alladin Stanley vacuum bottles during troop campouts, Camporees and the like. It was during those scouting events that I came to recognize the utility of these sturdy, well built containers.

First appearing in 1913; the all-steel vacuum bottle invented by William Stanley Jr. revolutionized the container industry by corroborating that steel can be used in lieu of glass to insulate.

Stanley using public has long realized that Stanley products are fabricated to last the lifespan of the owner and beyond. Of course the better care we show these useful containers the nicer they will remain, the longer they can be expected to last and the better they are likely to accomplish.

Today I use both my sturdy Alladin Stanley bottle and containers made by thermos. I have foregone using most thermos having glass liners for the reason my dad needed to replace the liner on occasion; they break.

Newer Thermos bottles are all metal, keep hot coffee hot and are lighter weight, skinnier and easier for me to carry to school in my rolling case than is my more bulky Stanley.

On the other hand, my handy Stanley bottle is often found in the car during winter trips. I have never been snowed in, off the road or whatever, however, the BSA motto, Be Prepared, is well engrained, with the Stanley bottle I know the water I put into it will not freeze whatever the temp and water as liquid will be available for drinking  in case it is needed during the snowy trips north to see son and family during winter.

As I age and arthritis in my hands continues to progress I find my Stanley bottle is becoming heavy and difficult for me to maneuver. I have no intention to set it aside, we will continue to use my handleless bottle for water especially during winter. However, I do intend to avail myself of one of the bottles having a handle on the side. The bottle, intended to hold coffee during trips or campouts, will still be heavy, however, I will be able to lift it using the handle, and will not need help with the bottle for many more trips or excursions to come.

I like that suggestions and recommendations for making optimum usage of Stanley products, including suggestion regarding making oatmeal in the bottle, are available on the Pacific Market International, PMI Stanley® website. I even found a downloadable pdf regarding care presented on the website.

 Care & Use of Stanley Stainless Steel products data regarding how to best use Stanley products per the website includes several cautions including;

– Do NOT use in microwave, oven or dishwasher!

-Don’t overfill with hot drinks; overfilling may lead to spillage and searing. The fill capacity is planned to be complete just below the lid base.

-When filled with hot liquid Stainless Steel Mugs should be used with caution when children are in proximity.

-Stainless Steel Water bottles are not intended for usage with hot beverages.

-Bottle lid should be attached firmly to prevent spills, and possible harm from spillage against bare skin.

-In order to minimize bacterial growth, Stanley bottles are not recommended for storage of warm milk products or baby foods.

The Stanley website includes recommendations for CARE & USE OF STAINLESS STEEL PRODUCTS includes:

-Wash products before use. To clean, wash with warm water and mild detergent. Let product stand for five minutes. Pour out washing water and rinse with warm water.

-Should inner area become discolored, a concoction of baking soda and water can be used. Add solution, let product stand uncapped, open for 60 minutes then rinse meticulously.

-Caution: bleach or cleansers containing chlorine to clean should not be used with Stanley vacuum bottles.

-Pre-heating or pre-chilling the Stanley bottle by adding steaming hot or ice-cold water, as mother’s of my generation always suggested, does aide in keeping coffee or other beverages hot or cold for a longer period. Fill bottle with hot or cold liquid; let stand for five minutes, empty the contents, add coffee or other beverage to be stored in the bottle.

-Stanley, a brand of PMI offers replacement parts on their website including cups, stoppers or gaskets, as well as food, drink and spirit container, mugs and cups.

-I like that Stanley products are warranted to be free from any defect in workmanship or materials and to be Thermally efficient provided used according to the instructions.

Note: This warranty does not cover component parts or malfunction due to alteration, misuse, or accident. If you have any questions regarding this or any other Stanley product, please call our customer service department

-Please note do not return product to retailer.

 Happy to recommend my vintage bottle: Standing about 14.5 inches in height and about 4 inches outer diameter; my bottle is one of the green, hammered outer shell types.

 While New bottles and other Stanley products are available on Amazon and Stanley websites; I will likely check jumble shop before purchase.

PMI USA

2401 Elliott Ave. 4th Fl

Seattle, WA USA 98121

 

Timeline per the Stanley website:

 

1913 William Stanley Jr. invents the all-steel vacuum bottle and revolutionizes the industry by proving steel can be used in place of glass to insulate.

 1915 The Stanley insulating company begins mass production of the Stanley vacuum bottle, insulating jugs and beverage servers.

 1942 Stanley bottles are first carried on WWII B-17’s, beginning a long history of use on military aircraft.

 1953 The iconic hammertone green is introduced for the first time on a Stanley bottle.

 1960’s A majority of airlines, ocean liners, railroads, and hospitals around the country now use Stanley commercial products.

 1970’s Modernized Stanley vacuum bottles gain popularity with the American workforce, making it the most popular vacuum bottle in history.

 1995 William Stanley Jr., who had obtained 129 patents related to both electricity and insulation during his career, is inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

 2002 Seattle, WA based PMI purchases the Stanley brand streamlining the design and manufacturing process while staying true to the brand’s legacy of durability and relevance.

 2006 The Outdoor Industry welcomes the Stanley brand. Within a few short years, Stanley Outdoor products will have made explorations all over the world including Mt Everest, North and South poles.

 2008 eCycle®, our proprietary blend of recycled material is first introduced in the Stanley Recycled & Recyclable 16oz Tumbler, first to offer reusable, BPA-free recycled and recyclable coffee mugs.

 2012 Outside Magazine names the Stanley Vacuum Bottle as one of “The Most Influential Gear of All Time.”

2013 We turn 100.

An Old Kitchen Stand By Never Gets Old

P315 B  a 4.5  X 11 inch loaf pan

 

cornflower loaf

 

(5/5)

Pros: long lasting, beautiful, durable, non staining,

Cons: used since the 1960s, not a con in the world for me

 

Corning Ware® original Pyroceram® cookware P315 B is a 4.5 X 11 inch loaf pan suitable for storing prepared dough and baking loaves of bread, storing a prepared meatloaf and baking the meat loaf in the oven and serving from the pan on the supper table. The pan is dandy for preparing lasagna or whatever entrée you choose to prepare ahead and bake later, or prepare now and bake now and serve for supper tonight.

These pans are meant for use in ovens and microwaves in addition to being used for storage in freezer and refrigerator. I have used my loaf pan in standard electric oven, not toaster oven, at heat to 350 – 375° F.   I stored many meat loaves and bread loaves for baking later in standard upright and chest type freezer and in refrigerator. These pans are not intended for stove top, burner, usage.

I have purchased, used and enjoyed Corning Ware original Pyroceram cookware from the time I first saw the initial advertisement for the product on television as a teen babysitting for spending money.

The concept was intriguing, the product was beautiful, and the notion that cook and serve in the same pan was possible, nicely,  had great appeal.

I date myself; my initial purchase went into my –hope chest– to be used when I was either married, or had moved out on my own following college.

Today, I still have, and regularly use,  my very first loaf pan and several others as well. There is nothing quite so tasty as good homemade bread, with butter and jam we made ourselves.

My Corning Ware Cornflower Loaf Pan features those pretty cornflower blossoms as was found on all the first pieces of the product. This 2 quart pan is a perfect size for making bread for supper, there was enough for everyone, but not so much that we had stale bread later. The pan was a dandy size for baking meat loaf, and because I had more than one pan, we enjoyed fresh bread AND meat loaf often as my boys were growing up.

My favorite bread recipe makes several loaves. I found having a group of loaf pans enabled me to divide the recipe into four portions, 1 for baking and 3 for freezing to take out later, let rise, and bake another day as well as having a dish for baking the entrée if.

This attractive pan ornamented with stylized blossoms, leaves and stems enjoyed a long manufactured run beginning in 1957 and continuing until discontinued in 1988. The pan includes a poly lid for use in freezer. Snap the lid onto the pan, and if you have several pans stack in freezer.

The top edge of the pan is smooth, has tabs at either end, and along the longer side is  a lip.

loaf

The lid is made with a lip to fit over the tabs at either end of the rectangular pan, and has a depression at the top surface allowing the bottom of the pan to seat down into the depression creating a nice, sturdy stack of pans filled with bread dough, meat loaf, chicken and dumplings or whatever you choose make ahead and freeze. Stacking the pans allows greater use of freezer space.

The poly lid should not be used during baking, broiling or top of the stove cooking. I do not use the poly lid in the microwave. I want the lid to continue to fit snugly in the freezer; microwave may cause the lid to warp.

My own personal cooking habits have long been to prepare several meals ahead; I found during the years I was raising children, having several meals in the freezer for popping into the oven made preparing supper a good bit easier and smoother for a busy household where both parents worked and children were active in scouting and we all attended church each week.

Pyroceram, a glass ceramic material initially developed for usage in the infant ballistic missile program the United States was realized as a possibility for crafting cookware capable for going from hot to cold or cold to hot without problem. The pans are nice enough to use for serving on the table, can be used to cook or warm foods in the oven, on the stove top and under the broiler.

I always liked having fewer dishes or pans to clean up after the meal. As more women began entering the work force as did I, the idea of prepare foods on the weekend, freeze, cook as needed and serve in the same pretty pan removed from the freezer held a lot of allure for myself and many others of my generation.

Nearly indestructible, easy to clean, difficult to burn food in the pan, Corning Ware’s record for durability was one of the things which ultimately led to problems for the company. No need to replace items that just don’t wear out, stain and become less attractive and the like.

My appealing, vintage, loaf baking pan(s) have been used many times during the many decades I have had the original, and all the others I have added to group. The original pan, as well as the ones that followed, continues to have a fine, unsoiled, lustrous white inner sidewall notwithstanding being used for myriad meat loaves replete with the tomato sauce we enjoy,  as well as other entrees in addition to loaf type cakes, loaves of bread and whatever else I have stored, baked and stored again whenever there were left over portions.

Over the years I added a number of other pieces to my initial corn flower blue casserole, loaf pan etc.

Initially each piece has also featured the pretty blue cornflower. I liked the fact that the pieces I bought during the early 1960s all matched, never wore out and short of deliberately throwing them onto a cement did not break.

Now that it is just Husband and myself I have kept the smaller pieces, and have given away most of the larger ones to sons as they have begun their own families.

And I have begun collecting one or two of the many other patterns produced during the hey day, as I find them in local thrift, jumble shops and garage sale offerings.

I always liked the appearance of the newer patterns, but as many other women, just could not justify replacing what I had.  The pans were beautiful, didn’t stain or break or anything untoward.

We were a generation not prone to replace just to replace, so I have kept, and now I add a smaller pan or two and this past weekend, another loaf pan!

If the price is good, it is hard to pass it by as I wander the aisle of the jumble shop.

I did buy some of the newer stoneware type baking dishes, and other than the mugs meant to be used in the microwave have given those pieces away. I find they are not so durable, easy to clean and keep clean and serviceable as are the original formula Pyroceram pieces.

NOTE: The following is information regarding Corning Ware/World Kitchen LLC.

If you, as I, am/are a collector, or think you might like to be, and/or have an interest in company information or perhaps need specific information regarding the manufacturing company itself, types of products made, where Pyroceram Glass items were mass-produced including years of issue, as well as, where they may be offered for sale today as well as other pertinent information regarding these lovely, serviceable pieces; you will be pleased to read, books are beginning to be written regarding the patterns, pieces, and company itself.

In addition, I am beginning to see a number of online sites offering pieces for sale. My own preference is for the pieces often found on shelves of local jumble shops, in thrift shops, as inventory during estate and garage sales and the like.

If bought from sites online;  the cost will be substantially more.

Original formula Pyroceram was discontinued during the late 1990s, and the new stoneware was introduced. Pieces are not manufactured as replicas, but the stoneware is not original formula Pyroceram. From internet search including perusal of the Corning Ware webpage: we learn that as happens with many new creations, Corning Ware cookware came to be because of a lab mistake.  The furnace failed, temperatures supposed to remain at 600C rose to 900c. However the glass did not become molten, retained its shape, and did not break when the startled scientist dropped the white glass produced.

This product that so many of us continue to use in our kitchens originated in 1953 when Pyroceram, a white, pyrex, ceramic like material having ability to tolerate vast disparity in temperature, was developed by Dr. S. Donald Stookey of Corning research and development division.

Primarily developed for the U.S. space program; Pyroceram was created from a substance originally meant for a U.S. ballistic missile program.

Dr. Stookey’s research centered around heat resistant material for nose cones. The original TV ads showed a rocket in the air, discussed the nosecone and showed a beautiful white with cornflower blue blossoms; cook pan. That is when my love affair Corning Ware™ original Pyroceram® cookware.  

World Kitchen, LLC

5500 N. Pearl Street Suite 400

Rosemont, IL60018

Happy to recommend Corning Ware® original Pyroceram® cookware P315 B is a 4.5 X 11 inch loaf pan

and to submit 1,594  words  to the July – August contest.